2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series – Noela Hueso

2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series – Noela Hueso Interviewed by Paula Barrow

 In connection with our 5th Annual LUNAFEST Film Festival event, which took place over the weekend, the Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) has created the LUNAFEST Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series. It features interviews pairing JLLB members making a difference in the Long Beach community with women making a difference in the entertainment industry.

 Follow the Q & A Interview Series at twitter.com/JL_LongBeach to find out when the next interviews will be posted. For more information about the traveling  LUNAFEST Film Festival, which highlights women filmmakers and their short films, visitwww.jllb.org/lunafest.

 For our fifth interview in the series, JLLB Advocacy Chair Paula Barrow will be talking with Noela Hueso, who is the author of theThe Art of The Croods, a beautiful hardcover book which showcases the conceptual art from the 2013 DreamWorks Animation filmThe Croods. She is also the Media Relations Manager for the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television.

 As Chair of the Advocacy Committee, Paula works to inform, educate and motivate the league on advocacy and public policy issues in the Long Beach community. Her JLLB work extends to engaging with Long Beach city officials to inform and grow their connections with the league. She also interacts with the delegates of JLLB’s California State of Public Affairs Committee (CalSPAC) to connect their advocacy work at the state level to the organization’s issue-based work at the local level. Paula joined the league in 2003 to learn more about her community and make friends with other women who shared the same goal of making positive changes in their communities. In June she will take on the role of Community Vice President as a member of the JLLB Board of Directors for the 2016 – 2017 year.

 In the spirit of the league as a training organization, Paula has taken the skills that she’s learned here to benefit other community organizations and efforts, including positions as the Chair of the Homeless Services Advisory Committee, Board of Directors for the Long Beach Continuum of Care, and Chair of the Strategic Planning Committee for the Young Women’s Empowerment Conference hosted by U.S. Congressman Alan Lowenthal (47th District).

 It turns out that Paula and Noela went to school together at San Diego High, also known as the Old Grey Castle. Go Cavers!

 Paula Barrow (PB): What is your current job/title and what was your first job in the entertainment industry?

 Noela Hueso (NH): My current title is Media Relations Manager at the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television. I’ve been there for almost three years. My previous permanent position was as a senior editor at The Hollywood Reporter, where I worked for 16 years. In between those two jobs, I wrote a book for DreamWorks Animation, The Art of The Croods, which showcased the fabulous conceptual art that the talented artists at DreamWorks Animation created when they brainstormed what their 2013 film, The Croods, would ultimately look like. The book also delved into the process of how the film was made.

 My first entertainment industry job was as a junior publicist for a boutique public relations agency but it was at The Hollywood Reporter, the job that followed, where I learned the ins and outs of the business. I started as an editorial assistant and worked my way up the ranks, assuming various titles through the years including copy editor, research editor, associate editor and finally senior editor.

 PB: What is your favorite part of the job?

 NH: When I was at The Hollywood Reporter, I dealt with people who were already successful in their careers, whether they were actors, directors, producers or cinematographers, just to name a few. My favorite part of my current job is seeing and working with Hollywood’s future trailblazers today, at the start of their careers.

 PB: What are the key aspects of your job and the qualities that are key to being successful in it?

 NH: I straddle two worlds in my current job: Editing and publicity. On the one hand, I write articles and newsletters and on the other, I facilitate interviews and get press for our school, faculty and students who are doing amazing things. Both jobs require an attention to detail as well as an ability to think creatively and to produce results. Great writing and communication skills are a must, too!

 PB: What advice would you give to women who want to work in the entertainment industry or do what you do?

 NH: Don’t get too comfortable in one place. You can grow much more as a person and in your career by being flexible and willing to take on new challenges in different environments. Go do the thing you think you cannot do. We limit ourselves because of fear — of the unknown, of financial instability, whatever. Get rid of those fears! Take a leap of faith. You will rise to the occasion; you will succeed.

 For years, I had wanted to write a book but always said, “Someday.” I was really good at procrastinating. With two children at home and a full-time job, I rationalized that there wasn’t enough time but I think, deep down, there was a fear of failure. Then, when I was laid off from The Hollywood Reporter after 16 years, the opportunity to write The Art of the Croods landed in my lap, for which I will be forever grateful. It came at an opportune time but also fulfilled a longtime creative goal. I could have said no to the project — it was detailed and involved — but instead I embraced the challenge and it ended up being a great success. Now I plan on writing another book!

 PB: Who or what inspires you creatively?

 NH: Not surprisingly, I am inspired by people who are adventurous, whether physically or mentally. They’re not afraid to go out on a limb to accomplish great things. They’re not afraid of failure. They know that there is no such thing as failure, really, just lessons learned.

Find out more about Noela Hueso below.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Art-Croods-Noela-Hueso/dp/1781164118

http://www.tft.ucla.edu/

This interview was edited by Lynda Miller, Public Relations Chair of the Junior League of Long Beach, who also had the pleasure of working with Noela for many years at The Hollywood Reporter. She transferred from the Los Angeles league to Long Beach in 2012 to continue doing community work after a career change. https://www.jllb.org/ama/orig/News/JLLB-LBHTTF_Guide_Press_Release1.pdf

When she’s not doing JLLB activities, Lynda is a PR, Sales & Fundraising Consultant who specializes in helping companies gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace.  https://www.jllb.org/?nd=February_2016

2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series

2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series – Tasha Day Interviewed by Ashleigh Ruhl

 In honor of our upcoming April 10th LUNAFEST event, a film festival highlighting women filmmakers, the Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) has created the LUNAFEST Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series. It features interviews pairing JLLB members making a difference in the Long Beach community with women making a difference in the entertainment industry.

 Follow the Q & A Interview Series at twitter.com/JL_LongBeach to find out when the next interviews will be posted. For more information about LUNAFEST, visit www.jllb.org/lunafest.

 For our fourth interview, JLLB Community Vice President Ashleigh Ruhl will be interviewing Tasha Day, Long Beach Film Commissioner and Manager of the Long Beach Special Events & Filming Office.

 Ashleigh is going into her fifth year in the league, spending the majority of her time focused on JLLB’s Kids in the Kitchen and other Community Impact programs; she is currently the Community Vice President on the Board of Directors and is looking forward to serving again next year as Executive Secretary. Ashleigh is a fifth-generation Colorado native who joined JLLB as a way to make friends in a new town.

 Outside of the league, Ashleigh has worked for more than a decade as a professional journalist, writer and social media manager, with her work published by Gazette Newspapers (or the Grunion Gazette), The Press-Telegram, City News Service, Long Beach Business Journal, Rocky Mountain News, and various other mediums online and in print.

 Serving for more than five years as the Editor of the Grunion Gazette, she got to know Long Beach very well, and is passionate about community journalism and educating residents about the issues impacting them in their own backyard.

 In one of her stories relating to the topic of filming in the city, Ashleigh wrote: “Long Beach boasts a history on the big screen that includes films such as Anchorman, Anger Management, Iron Man, Lethal Weapon, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Transformers and many others that have temporarily turned parts of Long Beach into San Diego or even Shanghai.”

 She has had the pleasure of interviewing Tasha Day before, for multiple articles about filming and special events in Long Beach, and Ashleigh was allowed special access to the filming of an episode of Dexter on one occasion. She has witnessed Day’s professionalism and the heavy workload carried by Day’s department, “which does great work to bring entertainment, notoriety and revenue to the city.”  Ashleigh believes Day is a real mover and shaker in the city, and is delighted that the league is highlighting this extraordinary woman.

 Ashleigh Ruhl (AR): What is your current job/title (along with top projects in your career) and what was your first job in the entertainment industry?

 Tasha Day (TD): My current job title is Manager of the Long Beach Special Events & Filming Office. I have worked on several filming projects including NCIS: LA, Iron Man, Transformers, Scorpion, Rush Hour series, NCIS, The Fosters, Straight Outta Compton, Live by Night, Animal Kingdom, Lethal Weapon series, and many more. My first job in the industry was as a Clerk Typist for the Special Events and Filming Office while I was attending college.

 AR: What does your typical day look like?

 TD: No two days are alike. Each day is different and exciting. I am always working on new filmings and events throughout the city.

 AR: What are three key aspects of your job and what are three qualities that are key to being successful in it?

  TD: I would say the key aspects of my job are creating relationships, scouting new locations, and coordinating logistics. The three qualities that are key to being successful are patience, understanding, and flexibility.  

  AR: What is your favorite part of the job?

 TD: Seeing the end product. Knowing that you have worked on something that has or will become successful.

 AR: Who or what inspires you?

 TD: My co-workers! Their constant support helps makes everyday a good day!

 AR: What advice would you give to women who want to work in the industry or do what you do?

 TD: I would say you need to have a strong personality. Set your goals and go after those goals. Don’t stop until you have achieved them!

 Find out more about Tasha Day below.

 http://www.filmlongbeach.com/

http://www.filmcalifornia.com/longbeach.html

This interview was edited by Lynda Miller, Public Relations Chair of the Junior League of Long Beach. She transferred from the Los Angeles league to Long Beach in 2012 to continue doing community work after a career change.https://www.jllb.org/ama/orig/News/JLLB-LBHTTF_Guide_Press_Release1.pdf

 When she’s not doing JLLB activities, Lynda is a PR, Sales & Fundraising Consultant who specializes in helping companies gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace.  https://www.jllb.org/?nd=February_2016

2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series: Sarah Feeley

Interviewed by Summer Smith

In honor of the upcoming April 10th LUNAFEST event, a film festival highlighting women filmmakers, the Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) has created the LUNAFEST Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series. It features interviews pairing JLLB members making a difference in the Long Beach community with women making a difference in the industry.

Follow the Q & A Interview Series at twitter.com/JL_LongBeach to find out when the next interviews will be posted. For more information about LUNAFEST, visitwww.jllb.org/lunafest.

 For our second interview, JLLB member and LUNAFEST Event Chair-Elect Summer Smith will be interviewing Sarah Feeley, director and producer of Raising Ryland, a documentary that will be screened at the 2016 JLLB LUNAFEST Film Festival. The film takes an intimate look inside the transgender experience as lived by a 6-year-old boy and his loving parents. Sarah will be participating in the Q & A filmmakers’ panel taking place directly after the screening. The panel will be moderated by JLLB President-Elect Virginia Zart.

 Sarah Feeley is also the creator and executive producer of My Side of the Sky, a breakout Hulu Spotlight series, and has worked on the Corpse Bride, PBS’ documentary series This Emotional Life, the documentary TV series The Freedom Files, the movie Warcase, and a variety of commercials. In addition, she writes for film, television, and advertising.

 Summer Smith joined JLLB in 2013, ready to roll up her sleeves with other committed and caring women, and eager to take advantage of the leadership development opportunities the league has to offer. Summer’s day job is in non-profit fundraising and administration for an outpatient behavioral health care provider, servicing foster care youth in Long Beach and surrounding areas.

 Summer Smith (SS): What is your current job/title (along with top projects in your career) and what was your first job in the entertainment industry?

 Sarah Feeley (SF): Filmmaker. Top Projects: Raising Ryland, My Side of the Sky, Iraq for Sale, and Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride. My first job in the entertainment industry was a paid internship at Hanna-Barbera.

 SS: What does your typical day look like?

 SF: It depends on the day. Every day is a little bit different. I could have an early call time and be on set or in the field. I could be losing track of time writing, editing, or creating. I could be in back-to-back meetings trying to sell a project. I could be leading my team through a difficult production or creative challenge. I could be managing the health of my business.

 SS: What are three key aspects of your job (e.g., producing, developing relationships) and what are three qualities that are key to being successful in it (e.g., persistence, flexibility)? 

 SF: Three key aspects of my job are creativity, abstract thinking and connecting-the-dots. Three qualities that are key to being successful in the entertainment business are drive, resilience, and optimism.

 SS: What is your favorite part of the job?

 SF: I have two favorite parts of the job. The first is getting the greenlight, and the second is seeing the impact my work has on audiences. All the parts in between are exhilarating, excruciating and wonderful, often at the same time.

 SS: Who or what inspires you creatively?

 SF: I recharge every week by getting out on a trail and reconnecting with nature, myself and the love of my life. I am blown away by the staggering beauty of this planet and amazed at the sights I can see by exerting some effort. Our hikes are an excuse to daydream for hours on end. They are also a lot like the entertainment business. Each project is a slow, hard climb that takes a lot out of you. But, the payoff can be beautiful and that makes it all worth it.

 SS: What advice would you give to women who want to work in the industry or do what you do?

 SF: Dream big and go for it! Keep an open mind. Stay curious. Work hard. Have integrity. Ask for help. Help other women. The pay gap, opportunity gap and power gap are real. Become aware of the explicit and implicit biases that are holding you and all women back and change the system. Be bold. Be brave. Be yourself.

 Find out more about Sarah Feeley below.

 Company website: www.milemarkerentertainment.comFilm website: http://www.raisingryland.com

Follow Sarah on Twitter: @Sarah_Feeley

This interview was edited by Rachael Rifkin, a Public Relations member of the Junior League of Long Beach. She has been in the league since January of 2012 because she believes in positive community programs. When she’s not doing JLLB activities, she’s a ghostwriter/personal historian who blogs about the traits we inherit and the qualities we find only in ourselves.

Goals Like a Boss

Goal setting is a crucial step in getting what you want – but where do we start?  How do we identify what we want in a world full of options?  For many of us the idea of deciding what we want to do or be, is overwhelming and scary.  Sometimes, setting goals feels like a useless task, because things always seem to change along the way. The reality is, it’s not the goal you’ve set that’s the problem, it’s the way you’ve set it that’s holding you back!  In this article we take a look at 5 steps to make goal setting easy and attainable.  These steps will not only help you visualize where you want to be, but also, help you set realistic timelines and stay accountable. 
Take a read and let us know – what goals will you be setting for yourself?   
Jenny Shirbroun

Practice Makes Perfect

Are there things that make you nervous?  Do you ever wonder how you would handle a situation?  We live in a world where there are “not nice” people and there are people who don’t intend to be mean, but are mean accidentally.  Do you know what you will do in that situation?  Do you know what you will say?  Do you know what you will feel?

Did you ever think of making a plan?  Then most importantly, PRACTICING that plan so when we are put into an uncomfortable situation we know what we will do and it is easy.  This way we don’t allow the uncomfortable situations to disrupt our day.  Having a plan makes us more comfortable and makes those around us more comfortable too.  It keeps us from getting so worked up that one negative interaction doesn’t ruin our entire day.

For example, pretend you have a test coming up and your best friend didn’t study.  You spent all week studying.  Do you know what you will say if they ask to copy?  Or what you will do if you notice they are trying to look at your paper during the test?  This is your very very best friend.  You don’t want to make them mad and you don’t want to fight with them.  Also, even though it’s not right for them to cheat, you don’t want to lose their friendship over it either.  If you don’t have a plan, you might end up saying that they can cheat but then feeling guilty about it all day or so nervous about getting caught that you don’t end up doing well on the test.  However, you can practice just through imagination in your own bedroom what you might say.  For example, you could say, “We might get caught, and I could get a bad grade.  I really need a good grade on this test, so I can’t risk it.”  Practice that in your bedroom.  Memorize it.  Close your eyes and imagine your very best friend asking you.  Then imagine you saying that sentence.  Then imagine it again and again and again.  Imagine all the different things your friend might say and what you would say back.  And then imagine hanging out together after the test and still being friends.  Repeat it over and over and over until you feel super comfortable with it.  Then when it happens you will know what to do and even though you’ve never actually done it before you’ve practiced so often that it feels like you have.

There once was a college diver who got hurt at the beginning of the season.  He couldn’t practice all season long.  But still every day he showed up to the pool and laid on the pool deck with his eyes closed. From the outside, he looked so funny.  His arms would go up and down and he’d hold himself in a ball then straighten out like an arrow.  Every day he did this all season long.  Right before the very last meet of the season the doctors said he was finally healed and allowed to dive.  His team needed him to finish in at least third place to win the meet.  No one expected him to be able to accomplish that because he hadn’t actually done a dive for most of the season.  To everyone’s surprise, he walked out on the diving board full of confidence.  He dove some of the most difficult dives of anyone at the meet and he finished in second place, just one point behind first place.  His team went on to win the meet.  He could dive with confidence because although he hadn’t actually practiced in the water for most of the season, he had practiced in his imagination so often that his body knew what to do when the time came to actually perform.  We can do the same thing with anything in our life.  Mental practice doesn’t have to be reserved for athletic performance; it can be used for anything.

What are you going to practice today?

–Jennifer Sears

Unity Day

Bullying is something that each of us faces at one point or another in our lives. Sometimes we have to face it head on. Sometimes we see our friends face it. And sometimes our children have to face it and it breaks our heart.

October is Bullying Prevention month. The entire month is spent trying to increase the conversation about bullying in our communities, schools, and homes. As part of Bullying Prevention month, the third Wednesday of the month has been declared Unity Day. All across the country people will dress in Orange with the intention of starting a conversation with their friends, neighbors, and family about bullying and how it affects our community. There are rallies, movie screenings, and assemblies that encourage discussion and empowerment.

Tomorrow is the third Wednesday of October.

Tomorrow is Unity Day.

Join us in the movement to combat bullying in the 5th-8th graders of our community by wearing Orange and posting photos on social. Are you unsure of what to talk about? Do you know how to start the conversation with your child? How about starting the conversation with your parent? A conversation about bullying can be difficult, so why don’t you start by showing the video above and see where the conversation goes from there.

No one can stop bullying if we pretend it doesn’t exist. So start talking and join the movement to change your community.
#Unity2015