2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series – Jacqueline Carroll Interviewed by Elizabeth McCann

In connection with our 5th Annual LUNAFEST Film Festival event, which took place earlier this month, the Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) has created the LUNAFEST Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series. It features interviews pairing JLLB members making a difference in the Long Beach community with women making a difference in the entertainment industry.

Follow updates to the Q & A Interview Series campaign and find out about new JLLB activities at twitter.com/JL_LongBeach. For more information about the traveling LUNAFEST Film Festival, which highlights women filmmakers and their short films, visithttps://www.jllb.org/support/lunafest/.

 For our seventh and last interview in the series, JLLB President Elizabeth McCann will be interviewing Jacqueline Carroll, who is the Head of Sales at Thunder Studios here in Long Beach.

 Elizabeth, who is a second generation native of Long Beach, joined the Junior League of Long Beach in 2009 to reengage in community involvement after years of leadership in other service organizations in Long Beach. One of a number of highlights in Elizabeth’s league career has been her Advocacy work on JLLB’s Public Affairs Committee — specifically, serving as both Junior and Senior Delegates for the Junior League of California’s State Public Affairs Committee (CalSPAC). Her other key roles in JLLB have included working in the Fund Development areas for the league and holding the Board of Directors position of Treasurer in a prior year to her current position as President.

 Outside of the league, Elizabeth is a Nonprofit Fundraising Leader who works with organizations in the Southern California area. She received her Bachelor of Arts in English and American Studies and her Master of Public Administration degrees from the University of Southern California.

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 Photo caption, from left: Elizabeth and Jacqueline both participated in a video shoot to discuss these questions on camera last month at Thunder Studios.

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 Elizabeth McCann (EM): What was your first job in the entertainment industry?

Jacqueline Carroll (JC): My first job in the industry was at Creative Artists Agency (CAA). I worked there for about five years and I decided to take a different route. I realized that I wasn’t going to be an agent – I just didn’t have it in me – so I started looking around and a friend told me about Thunder Studios.

 EM: What does your typical day look like?

 JC: A typical day for me here starts off with lots of emails, which are mostly inquires from clients who are looking for production space, or from clients who are already in on a project. It’s not just sales – I do a lot of operations as well. We’re kind of a small team here at Thunder and we all wear many hats.

 EM: What are some of your favorite projects here at the Studios?

 JC: I would say Nine Eleven is a favorite project that we just started filming last month. It’s our first co-production as a studio and it stars Charlie Sheen, Whoopi Goldberg, Luis Guzman, Wood Harris, and Olga Fonda. We have branched out to do our own thing, and to take control of our destiny, as the CEO says.

 EM: How has the studio grown over the years?

 JC: It became Thunder Studios in 2013. Previously, it was a third-party rental company and we were only renting out to production companies that had jobs. When Rodric David took over, he decided to branch off in a couple of different directions. We started our own production company in-house to take advantage of the fact that we have this huge studio and now we are also bidding jobs to clients and creative agencies.

 In addition, we launched a digital media platform and are getting more involved in digital content, with two stages that are dedicated to YouTube creators. So if you sign up with our multi-channel network (MCN), then you’re able to come in and take advantage of all of the resources that our facility has to offer.

 EM: What are the key aspects of your job that you enjoy the most?

JC: I just love working with different people, whether they’re with our own in-house production company or with a third party. It’s also that I like being part of something major. I didn’t really have an appreciation for commercials until I started working here and didn’t see all of the work that went into them before they were made: You have about seven days to make 30 seconds of television and a brand has probably given you $1 million to $2 million for it, so it has to be great.

EM: What qualities do you attribute to your success?

 JC: I would say that I’m diligent and relentless. And I’m also a master networker – I can’t stress that enough. It’s getting out there and meeting people, and always being gracious and cordial and keeping those opportunities open.  I think that’s very important for anything you’re going to do, especially in entertainment.  I think this is one of the key components that makes me good at what I do.

EM: Who would you say has inspired you the most?

JC: My grandmother, who was a professor at USC for four years, was a huge inspiration to me. In entertainment though, it’s really anybody who goes after what they want. And if they don’t give up, and they do it in a positive way, then that’s an inspiration to me.

EM: What words of advice would you give to women who want to work in the industry or do what you do?

JC: We’re at this threshold where we’re about to enter into a different way of life, so for women, there is still a bit of a battle. But it’s being relentless. You have to believe in yourself, and rely on yourself, and know that the things that you have to offer up are worthy and valuable. If you believe in what you’re doing, then I don’t think anything can stop you – I think it’s mostly relying on who you are and not giving up.

Find out more about Jacqueline Carroll below.

http://www.thunderstudios.com/

https://www.youtube.com/user/ThunderStudiosInc

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4917224/?ref_=nv_sr_1


This interview was edited by Lynda Miller, Public Relations Chair of the Junior League of Long Beach. She transferred from the Los Angeles league to Long Beach in 2012 to continue working in the community after a career change. When she’s not doing JLLB activities, Lynda is a PR, Sales & Fundraising Consultant who specializes in helping companies gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace.https://www.linkedin.com/in/lyndamiller1

Especially Me!

Studies indicate that up to 62% of girls are insecure about themselves. As many as seven in ten girls believe they are not good enough or do not measure up in some way. The Junior League of Long Beach is pleased to announce our upcoming Especially Me! event dedicated to addressing these very issues.

Our 2015 event was a HUGE success, with rave reviews from the fifth grade girls in attendance, and there was a waiting list for additional girls who wanted to attend. Especially Me! is designed to teach girls the skills they need to be happy and confident, to make good decisions, to be assertive, to express themselves, and to have a strong sense of self. The goal of the course is to instill the idea in each girl that she is unique and special and that she can take control of her own life. Topics covered include self-esteem, body awareness, puberty, nutrition, positive body image, mass media misrepresentations, decision-making, assertiveness, and goal setting.

The Junior League of Long Beach is an organization of women volunteers dedicated to issues that affect the children of our community. We have organized seven Especially Me! courses during the last four school years, and the positive feedback from the girls and the participating schools indicates that there is a strong need for programs such as this.

 Maria, an Especially Me! participant said, “I think this class is great. I have very low self-esteem. I’ve always thought I was ugly. I’ve always thought I was fat and never ‘perfect.’ It was never easy, especially when my mom and dad said I had bad skin and I was ugly. That always brought me down. I can start building my self esteem again.”

 Trained Junior League members facilitate the sessions, which are taught in an interactive format. The girls attend the course by themselves, as we have found they are sometimes more comfortable discussing sensitive issues outside the presence of their parents or guardians. In addition, we are happy to answer questions or provide additional information regarding the content of the classes at any time.

 This year, Especially Me! will take place on January 30, 2016, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Washington Middle School, 1450 Cedar Ave., Long Beach. Enclosed you will find a flyer and consent form.

 In order for the girls to be registered for the course, please email or mail dated and signed parent permission slips, the child’s name and school to the contact below by January 15th. You are welcome to scan the permission slips/releases and email them back to us instead. We will accept girls on a first come, first served basis until all of our 100 spaces are full. Once the consent form has been received, you will receive a confirmation letter that will include more information on drop off, pick up, and other logistics.

 If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to email us at community@jllb.org or contact us by phone at 562-989-6400.

5776, My Year of Connection

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September brings lots of new years’ for me. It’s a new year of work, school, a new year for the Junior League, and the new Jewish year, 5776. Jews spend the 10 days between Rosh Hashanah (the New Year) and Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement) to reflect on the past year and make resolutions for the year ahead. They are called the Days of Awe, and I am definitely finding inspiration in them, without even intending to do so.

Since Monday, the first year of 5776, I have found that the universe has made me more connected than productive. On days that I would normally get a lot of computer or administrative work done, I have had one meaningful, deep, and insightful conversation after the other. Making my days not so productive, but very emotionally connected to the people around me.

I’ve been there for the colleague whose wife just called to tell him their marriage was over. I’ve had an extended chat with my girlfriend on how we make our marriages work with our busy lives.  I even connected with an old high school friend on what’s truly important, what we would change if we could and how much our friendship is valued by each other.

This might sound like a normal week for most, but not me.  I’m more of a “down to business” kind of gal, who’s not cold, per se, but definitely not the warmest coal on the heap.  Or at least I haven’t been, until now.  5776.  Oh, and did I mention my anniversary fell on New Year’s Eve? A coincidence I have tried not to overlook and even been more patient and attentive with my husband.

The other day, instead of worrying about how I was going to keep my boys busy for an hour I had alone with them, I just decided that cuddling and watching TV in the short hour that we had was enough. I want to relish these days when the boys are young and want to cuddle with me, instead of worrying about them getting too much screen time.

I plan on resolving this year to prioritize those meaningful conversations I have with people about the relationships in their lives over getting work done. I plan on taking the extra minutes I have to cuddle with my boys and just relax and recharge and let them know that I am physically there for them.

In 5776, I will let go of the need to plan every minute, to make every activity structured, to worry about what my fellow mommies and my husband would think. What matters is that I spend my time with my boys, my husband and my colleagues, connecting in ways that really matter.

5776, My Year of Connection.  May the Schwartz Be With You

-Mary S.

13 Things to Learn in School

lessons_learned

I have two children in elementary school and for some reason it seems like a much different scene than it was four years ago when my nine year old started kindergarten. We just dropped her off at class and that was it. Now I seem to be thinking about things more than I did before. Did we make the right choice of school? Will she do okay in a classroom setting? Will she like school? Will she remember to ask for help? Will my husband and I adjust to having two kids in school? Will I miss the kids more?

To get myself through the transition I made myself a list of 13 things I hope my kids will do or at least think about in school:

  1. Kindergarten: Have fun! Be yourself, and don’t be afraid to get dirty!
  1. First Grade: Learn to enjoy reading, and don’t be afraid to read Green Eggs and Ham 100 times if you want to.
  1. Second Grade: Don’t get frustrated with cursive hand writing, or math. Explore the world around you, and don’t forget to have fun.
  1. 3rd Grade: Have fun with class projects. Learn all about a city or place far away from where you live.
  1. 4th Grade: Be creative, and enjoy learning. There are so many different things to be learned this year. And I really hope you are having fun.
  1. 5th Grade: Learn that it is okay to do something slow, and master that something when you can.
  1. 6th Grade: Don’t be afraid to be yourself, and definitely don’t be afraid to speak your mind.
  1. 7th Grade: Love yourself, and realize that there are lots of other awkward kids out there just like you. And speaking from experience, don’t let your parents tell the principal that you don’t have enough homework.
  1. 8th Grade: Remember that if there was ever a true definition of the subject of Algebra it would be: Hard-As-Hell.
  1. 9th Grade: Enter high school with an open mind. Do what you want to do because you want to, not because someone else told you not to or told you to do so. And by now I really hope you realize how much fun you really should be having in school.
  1. 10th Grade: Don’t be afraid to ask for help. And tell your parents you don’t need a “student driver” sticker for the back of their car, and that they don’t need to yell “cat” as you come to an intersection to get your attention while you are learning to drive.
  1. 11th Grade: Don’t turn away a friend in need. Don’t be afraid to ask a teacher, counselor, or even the school principal for advice.
  1. 12th Grade: You have made it, and college is around the corner, but study what you want in college even if it won’t pay the bills after college or your parents don’t understand it. Play the sports you always wanted to play, act the part in the play you always wanted, and don’t be afraid to follow your dreams. You didn’t spend 13 years in school learning the tools to succeed if you had no plans to use them in the real world.

………And please tell me that at some point during the last 13 years in school you at least had some fun in school.

-Annie P.

Hanging On To Hair

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Strange as it sounds, yes, I’ve been hanging on to my hair.  My story may seem vain at first glance, but please ladies, hear me out.

Like so many others, I’ve always struggled with self image and confidence. After decades of makeup experiments and style flops, my hair was the only area that I actually loved (sad but true). Even more so when I was pregnant and even post baby, I was always complimented on my hair. It was long, thick and fortunately I was able to style it decently. As a grown woman, I allowed my hair to define me.  No, it wasn’t naturally luxurious or glamorous, it took loads of time and work.  But it was work that I had time for prior to the birth of my daughter. Shortly after her arrival, it became clear that I wouldn’t have that kind of extra time for a while. I wasn’t able to wash it as often, let alone style it. And as my daughter became an active toddler, my hair was tossed in a bun daily, which had me wondering why I was hanging on to this hair?

As my mom style finally began to define itself (relaxed tees, jeans and flats), I realized that my long, luxurious locks were a thing of the past. Not only that, but my strands were holding me back. I hated that I couldn’t just toss up my hair and roll out the door (at the pace of my kiddo). And after my daughter expressed anxiety over losing her hair during her first trim, my mind was made up. I couldn’t allow her to view hair, makeup, or clothing as an important piece of who a woman is. I want her to see them for who they are and not how long their hair is. I know, she’s only 3 and maybe too young to fully get it.  But, she definitely imitates others and is very curious, so it can’t hurt.

The woman I was 3 years ago has definitely evolved since becoming a mom, and my hair was such a small part of that big transition.  The change as a whole was so much more than I ever expected.  The pre-baby me would have laughed at the thought of staying in on Saturday nights or skipping a shower. I would have snagged the 4 inch stilettos instead of the memory foam flats at the shoe store. After losing the 8 inches of hair, I feel free, comfortable and more momish than before.  Proof that change is good, ladies.

-Kristin S.

Daily Affirmations

I like my whole house

A few years back, a friend sent me a link to a YouTube video of an adorable young girl named Jessica chanting and singing into the mirror about everything she likes about her life. The video is titled “Jessica’s ‘Daily Affirmations’” and was all over social media. Many of you probably saw it. This 4-year-old girl captured our hearts because she was so fearless in proclaiming how much she liked her haircut, her pajamas, her family … the list goes on and on. Every once in a while, the video pops up somewhere again and I watch it, and every time I am left with a smile on my face.

I recently noticed that someone had made a “10 years later” version of the video, where Jessica is now 14 and complaining about everything, including her haircut, her pajamas, and her family. It made me chuckle (I remember those 14-year-old feelings), but also made me realize that the 14-year-old me tends to have a stronger presence than the 4-year-old me in my daily thoughts, and that just will not fly.

We all need to work a little harder at keeping our inner 4-year-old alive and well. I don’t know that we all need to go stand in front of the mirror and sing about all the awesome things in our lives (although it does sound really fun), but we should at least write them down and remind ourselves. And, after we write those things down, we should share it with a friend. Because feeling awesome about things in our lives is something we need to celebrate. Jessica celebrates a lot within a 50 second video on YouTube, so imagine what we can each celebrate just by taking a couple of minutes and thinking about (or singing about) what we love about ourselves and our lives. I am starting my list today, and making a point to keep that list growing. I hope you will do the same!

If you haven’t seen the video, or want to watch it again for inspiration, here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qR3rK0kZFkg

“I love my whole house!”

-Allison A

Where Would I Be Without My Dad?

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Where would I be without my dad?

That is a pretty simple question, right? The first answer that comes to mind is that I wouldn’t be here at all, and well yeah that’s probably right, but that’s not the answer I am looking for.

I wouldn’t be here today on the verge of turning 38 without the confidence I received from my dad.

I wouldn’t be writing this article if it wasn’t for the confidence I received as a child from my dad. My dad was always one of those dads who never said no if you really wanted to learn something, but I was always one of those kids who might have think twice or even three times before starting something new, and then had to think really hard about wanting to finish it. I remember being 8 years old and my dad taking me to the tennis courts to play tennis with him and my then 5 year old brother. My brother was good from the get go, where as I needed help, and my dad was always encouraging me, and instilling the confidence in me that I could be a good tennis player as well. He did the same thing about 10 years later when our church was forming a choral group for the weekly youth mass. It wasn’t something I initially thought about, but I figured I would show up anyways; the choral group turned into a trio because only 3 girls showed up. I was scared out of mind, but I did it and I learned that as tone deaf as I thought I sounded I could sing in a trio. My dad who couldn’t read a note of music, but could sing anyways had the confidence to join the adult choir, so why couldn’t I?

When I decided to major in communications in college because I wanted to study broadcasting my dad never discouraged me from it because he wanted me to study what I wanted to study. I needed his confidence even more my junior year when I moved 500 miles away from home, and I got an F on a college paper, and wanted to go back to my old university where school hadn’t been such a challenge. Confidence and knowing that I was doing something I loved and my parents approved of kept me going.

When I was offered a full time job crunching numbers for the government a year out of college, did I turn it down because I didn’t take a single business class in college? Nope, I used the confidence I had gained from my dad who had a career as a wine salesman, and jumped right in. Almost 15 years later I am still crunching numbers for the government.

I look at the confidence I received from my dad, and I hope that I am giving that same confidence to my daughters as they grow up. I know the world will think that they gain all of their confidence from their mother, but I really hope that when they are grown up and have children of their own that they know that they got lots of confidence from their dad too.

– Annie P.