2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series

2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series – Jann Goldsby Interviewed by Janice Merriweather

In connection with our 5th Annual LUNAFEST Film Festival event, which took place earlier this month, the Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) has created the LUNAFEST Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series. It features interviews pairing JLLB members making a difference in the Long Beach community with women making a difference in the entertainment industry.

 Follow the Q & A Interview Series at twitter.com/JL_LongBeach to find out when the next interview will be posted. For more information about the traveling LUNAFEST Film Festival, which highlights women filmmakers and their short films, visitwww.jllb.org/lunafest.

 For our sixth interview in the series, JLLB Sustainer Janice Merriweather will be interviewing Jann Goldsby, who is an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter working on the set of the TV show Switched at Birth.

 Janice joined the Junior League of Long Beach in 1988 when she was encouraged to do so by a Past President of the Junior League of Los Angeles. “She explained to me the Junior League’s mission as a training organization that helps develop the potential of women. Thus, after training and working on various projects and fundraisers in the league, a member would have exceptional skills to take that training out into the community and make a difference where she saw a need,” said Janice, who herself became a President of JLLB and served in this position during the 1995 – 1996 year.

 After nearly three decades of service in the league, she is still active as a Sustainer. Janice’s numerous accomplishments with JLLB include her role as co-chair of the organization’s 80th Anniversary Celebration Committee, which raised $30,000 for The Children’s Dental Clinic, the Junior League of Long Beach’s first project after its founding in 1931. Janice also produced a historical video that gives viewers a comprehensive overview of JLLB’s contributions to the community over the years.https://www.jllb.org/about/our-history/

 Janice is a recently retired General Manager/Executor for an aviation pioneer and cattle rancher with offices in Long Beach and Beverly Hills. She has served for several years on Casa Youth Shelter’s Board and as a Board Trustee member in Los Alamitos; as a member of Phoenix, a support group for the Long Beach Museum of Art; and as a member of The Links of Orange County, an international, non-profit organization of women committed to educational and civic programs. She has also served as a member and mentor in Cameo, an auxiliary of the Assistance League of Long Beach.

——————-

Caption for photo above: From left, Janice and Jann also discussed these interview questions on camera during a video shoot held last month at Thunder Studios in Long Beach.

——————-

 Janice Merriweather (JM): What is your current job/title and what was your first job in the entertainment industry?

Jann Goldsby (JG): My current job title is American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreter on the set of the TV show Switched At Birth (SAB). My first theatrical interpreting experience came from ASL interpreting off-Broadway shows in New York City.

JM: What does your typical day look like?

JG: A typical day at Switched at Birth or any other film/TV production usually starts with the make-up and hair people.  At SAB, while in the make-up trailer, I will often run lines with the actor until he or she is called to set for rehearsal where at that time I will often speak the actor’s lines for the director…who is hearing and does not know the language. I will often cue the actor during the actual filming and interpret when the director has specific notes to give. I am also there to facilitate the social banter on the set as well. 

JM: What are the key aspects of your job and the qualities that you believe make you successful?

JG: Whenever possible, I will leave any questions regarding Deaf culture and language up to the actor to give a response.  When anybody on the set wants to know a sign I will direct them to the actor.  There is often a “family” feeling on the set after many months and years, and so I will often answer some questions regarding culture and language when it is necessary or the actor isn’t available at that moment, but it’s always in an effort to create more awareness and sensitivity to the Deaf community. This job requires having no ego. I’m just there to facilitate conversation and make it go as smoothly as possible.

JM: What is your favorite part of the job?

JG: My favorite part of the job is…just being there (smile). I love the creative aspect of the atmosphere. Also, if I’m there, then it means that an actor who is deaf has work!  And while forming friendships is a wonderful by-product of my work, again, it means there is a production that has been willing to showcase an actor who is deaf

JM: Who or what inspires you?

JG: In my particular job I am mostly inspired by the actor who is deaf.  I am always fascinated to see how they will interpret the script and thus their character.  And when I am witness to a hearing director who has never worked with an actor who is deaf before and has himself or herself become more aware and inspired from it, that is also very gratifying.

 JM: What advice would you give to women who want to work in the industry or do what you do?

JG: My advice to anybody who wants to be an ASL interpreter on a set is to leave your ego at the door!  The job is in no way about “you.”  The interpreter is an extra body on an already crowded set so to be able to deftly navigate yourself well on said set is a plus!

Find out more about Jann Goldsby below.

https://twitter.com/goldsbylocks

This interview was edited by Lynda Miller, Public Relations Chair of the Junior League of Long Beach. She transferred from the Los Angeles league to Long Beach in 2012 to continue doing community work after a career change. When she’s not doing JLLB activities, Lynda is a PR, Sales & Fundraising Consultant who specializes in helping companies gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace. https://www.linkedin.com/in/lyndamiller1

2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series – Anna Schumacher Interviewed by Alex Weiss

2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series – Anna Schumacher Interviewed by Alex Weiss

 In honor of the upcoming April 10th LUNAFEST event, a film festival highlighting women filmmakers, the Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) has created the LUNAFEST Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series. It will feature interviews pairing JLLB members making a difference in the Long Beach community with women making a difference in the industry.

 Follow the Q & A Interview Series at twitter.com/JL_LongBeach to find out when the next interviews will be posted. For more information about LUNAFEST, visit www.jllb.org/lunafest.

 For our third interview, JLLB Vice President of Fund Development Alex Weiss will be interviewing filmmaker Anna Schumacher, who directed, wrote and appeared as an actress in Finding June, which will be screened at LUNAFEST. The short fiction film explores communication’s role in understanding one another through the eyes of a deaf women who has just been diagnosed with breast cancer.

 Anna will be participating in the Q & A filmmakers’ panel taking place directly after the screening. The panel will be moderated by JLLB President-Elect Virginia Zart.

 Alex joined the Junior League of Long Beach in 2010 and for the past six years has had roles including Chair of Community Impact Programs, Vice President overseeing Community Programs and Advocacy, and now most recently, Vice President of Fund Development. Alex has always known that an innate part of herself has the need to give back to the community to make a difference and foster change. Professionally, Alex is the Corporate & Community Partnerships Manager for the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network and leads fundraising and corporate support for the western United States.

 Alex Weiss (AW): What is your current job/title (along with top projects in your career) and what was your first job in the entertainment industry?

Anna Schumacher (AS): Technically, I’m an American Sign Language interpreter by day, and an artist by night. I came to L.A. at the encouragement of a Deaf Studies teacher of mine from Berkeley City College to connect with Deaf West Theatre. At Deaf West I worked with the production team and quickly became immersed in the community. As I settled into L.A., I found more and more work as an interpreter, learning as I went and loving the language more and more. Through this I met an actor on the television show Switched at Birth, which became my Hollywood industry gig. As an artistic ensemble member of the theater and art production company cARTel: Collaborative Arts LA, I was also spreading my wings from theater actor to director, writer, and even clowning. I did my first film in the spring of 2013, about a year after I moved to L.A.

 AW: What does your typical day look like?

AS: It varies, though it certainly always starts with walking three whiny puppies earlier than I’d like! Freelance interpreting means on any given day I could be working in a school, court, or doctors’ office. This work takes me all over town with all kinds of folks. I make time every day to connect with me, via yoga and writing. I have an almost daily habit of reviewing previous writing exercises to re-write and re-imagine. My favorite days are when production is imminent and I’m in producer mode, tying up loose ends by scouting, making shot lists, and getting notes from those I send my work to.

 AW: What are three key aspects of your job (e.g., producing, developing relationships) and what are three qualities that are key to being successful in it (e.g., persistence, flexibility)? 

 AS: For this question I’ll call my job filmmaking as it’s a piece of what makes me tick. Three aspects of this work are candor, tenacity, belief. The people who succeed respect the time and talents of their team and believe in the work being made, full stop. They aren’t above sending email after email asking for help when they need it.

 AW: What is your favorite part of the job?

AS: Watching a project you love take tangible shape is humbling and empowering — two of the best feelings there are.

 AW: Who or what inspires you creatively?

 AS: I think a lot in pictures. An example I often use: sometimes I’m out and maybe it’s raining. I’ve forgotten a jacket so I’m feeling bemused, and then I see a woman at a bus stop with a plastic bag full of socks and a cat on a neon green leash. (I live in Hollywood!) What a scene. So I think, whose socks are those? Who is this woman? Who walks their cat anyway? And then my mind goes. Like the non-Spanish speaker watching a telenovela, I begin to imagine the life I’m seeing. It’s so cool to know that I can literally look at the world around me, pause longer than most do, and be inspired to write a scene, a life, a story.

 AW: What advice would you give to women who want to work in the industry or do what you do?

AS: Please do what moves you, and be kind while you do it, but without apology. As women we are conditioned to say sorry, or even to question ourselves and our ability. People will push back, they’ll require more from you. It can feel bleak out there, but I believe that if you embrace your true self, you can be a formidable player and make your mark. Or to say it another way, and to paraphrase fellow filmmaker Meg Smaker: Regardless of anatomy, if you’re embracing your femme self, you’re being a badass extraordinaire.

Find out more about Anna Schumacher below.

http://www.lunafest.org/the-films/details/finding-june

This interview was edited by Rachael Rifkin, a Public Relations member of the Junior League of Long Beach. She has been in the league since January of 2012 because she believes in positive community programs. When she’s not doing JLLB activities, she’s a ghostwriter/personal historian who blogs about the traits we inherit and the qualities we find only in ourselves.

2016 JLLB LUNAFEST® Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series: Sarah Feeley

Interviewed by Summer Smith

In honor of the upcoming April 10th LUNAFEST event, a film festival highlighting women filmmakers, the Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) has created the LUNAFEST Women in Entertainment Q & A Interview Series. It features interviews pairing JLLB members making a difference in the Long Beach community with women making a difference in the industry.

Follow the Q & A Interview Series at twitter.com/JL_LongBeach to find out when the next interviews will be posted. For more information about LUNAFEST, visitwww.jllb.org/lunafest.

 For our second interview, JLLB member and LUNAFEST Event Chair-Elect Summer Smith will be interviewing Sarah Feeley, director and producer of Raising Ryland, a documentary that will be screened at the 2016 JLLB LUNAFEST Film Festival. The film takes an intimate look inside the transgender experience as lived by a 6-year-old boy and his loving parents. Sarah will be participating in the Q & A filmmakers’ panel taking place directly after the screening. The panel will be moderated by JLLB President-Elect Virginia Zart.

 Sarah Feeley is also the creator and executive producer of My Side of the Sky, a breakout Hulu Spotlight series, and has worked on the Corpse Bride, PBS’ documentary series This Emotional Life, the documentary TV series The Freedom Files, the movie Warcase, and a variety of commercials. In addition, she writes for film, television, and advertising.

 Summer Smith joined JLLB in 2013, ready to roll up her sleeves with other committed and caring women, and eager to take advantage of the leadership development opportunities the league has to offer. Summer’s day job is in non-profit fundraising and administration for an outpatient behavioral health care provider, servicing foster care youth in Long Beach and surrounding areas.

 Summer Smith (SS): What is your current job/title (along with top projects in your career) and what was your first job in the entertainment industry?

 Sarah Feeley (SF): Filmmaker. Top Projects: Raising Ryland, My Side of the Sky, Iraq for Sale, and Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride. My first job in the entertainment industry was a paid internship at Hanna-Barbera.

 SS: What does your typical day look like?

 SF: It depends on the day. Every day is a little bit different. I could have an early call time and be on set or in the field. I could be losing track of time writing, editing, or creating. I could be in back-to-back meetings trying to sell a project. I could be leading my team through a difficult production or creative challenge. I could be managing the health of my business.

 SS: What are three key aspects of your job (e.g., producing, developing relationships) and what are three qualities that are key to being successful in it (e.g., persistence, flexibility)? 

 SF: Three key aspects of my job are creativity, abstract thinking and connecting-the-dots. Three qualities that are key to being successful in the entertainment business are drive, resilience, and optimism.

 SS: What is your favorite part of the job?

 SF: I have two favorite parts of the job. The first is getting the greenlight, and the second is seeing the impact my work has on audiences. All the parts in between are exhilarating, excruciating and wonderful, often at the same time.

 SS: Who or what inspires you creatively?

 SF: I recharge every week by getting out on a trail and reconnecting with nature, myself and the love of my life. I am blown away by the staggering beauty of this planet and amazed at the sights I can see by exerting some effort. Our hikes are an excuse to daydream for hours on end. They are also a lot like the entertainment business. Each project is a slow, hard climb that takes a lot out of you. But, the payoff can be beautiful and that makes it all worth it.

 SS: What advice would you give to women who want to work in the industry or do what you do?

 SF: Dream big and go for it! Keep an open mind. Stay curious. Work hard. Have integrity. Ask for help. Help other women. The pay gap, opportunity gap and power gap are real. Become aware of the explicit and implicit biases that are holding you and all women back and change the system. Be bold. Be brave. Be yourself.

 Find out more about Sarah Feeley below.

 Company website: www.milemarkerentertainment.comFilm website: http://www.raisingryland.com

Follow Sarah on Twitter: @Sarah_Feeley

This interview was edited by Rachael Rifkin, a Public Relations member of the Junior League of Long Beach. She has been in the league since January of 2012 because she believes in positive community programs. When she’s not doing JLLB activities, she’s a ghostwriter/personal historian who blogs about the traits we inherit and the qualities we find only in ourselves.